Blog

December 4, 2012

Family and Opera

It is 10.30 in the morning and my adorable terminator and princess have just left the building. I am sure that most of my neighbors are thankful that they are now spared the constant rustle and bustle a 6  and an 8 year old inevitably bring with them. On the other hand here I am, missing them terribly already which brings to the fore the, arguably, only really serious problem that one has to live with in order to have an international operatic career; long periods away from loved ones. I mean, really? How can you not miss someone who tells you that you are still a great, graceful skater despite the fact that your skating prowess is not unlike a drunken bull in a china shop?

I think few established opera singers would argue that there is anything more difficult than being away from one’s family and friends. Skype and long weekend trips make it easier but the latter still doesn’t really replace the beautiful everyday moments like picking up your kids from school or tucking them into bed. I have flown to Malta at crazy times, sometimes immediately after concerts, just to be able to pick my children from school the next day.

This is one of the reasons I take a sabbatical off singing professionally a couple of months a year and it is also why you might see me, very early, checking in for a flight sporting a face that should really be still resting on the pillow.

In the end the most beautiful sounds I have heard to date are the spoken words “papa.” Of course the phrase “you are the best dad in the world” comes in at a very close second….

Comments

  1. Lovely heartfelt description of – as you say – the most difficult part of the job.
    When I started gathering interviews for my book about tenors, it was pre-skype days. And for some of the guys in the late 1990s, they were just starting to carry laptops with them. I heard lots of stories of calling home every day to stay involved that way… flying home in the middle of rehearsals or between performances (to the dismay of opera company management) for a quick visit… and some who lost the connections forever.
    Thanks for this description of a part of your world – and bravo for scheduling the annual vacation for yourself.
    ciao,

  2. Bente Smidt

    I really understand that it may be difficeult. I’ve often thought about it regarding other singers, especially my favourite soprano Kiri Te Kanawa, whom i’ve followed for decades now. You spend so long periods of being away from home. We must all be very grateful to you that you’re dedicating so much time and energy to your singing.
    I’ve just received the CDs with the greatest tenors of the world. I love it, and recommend it to all my friends. Thank you!

  3. Rosa

    Te admiro como cantante y mucho mas como persona, por tu gran humanidad.
    Tengo un hijo que es Director General tiene dos hijos de la edad de los tuyos y solo les ve los fines de semana.

    Gracias por compartir tus sentimientos con nosotros.
    Estoy deseando de verte en el Baluarte el 14 de enero

  4. I always feel rather sorry for singers when they mention being away from their families for long periods of time. I’ve read articles with other tenors who mention just bawling with homesickness, and it makes me want to give all you wonderful musicians a hug and all my gratitude for sharing your wonderful music with us. It was nice that your kids got to join you and help you with your ice skating. Hope you get to be with them again soon!

    • admin

      there are way worse things in life and we are so privileged to get to do what we love for a living. thanks for your feedback!

  5. Christine

    What lovely heart- warming comments! Really enjoyed reading. Keep this up and God bless you and your two special bundles of joy.

  6. Joanne

    Joseph…. I can understand perfectly how you feel…..God Bless You and Keep you strong. You have a beautiful family …. treasure every moment you can.
    Shame on us who just come and listen to a performance and most of the time do not appreciate or realize what huge sacrifices you Singers have to do.
    Keep Up the Good Work….:-)

  7. Vincent

    Joseph,
    You have such a wonderful gift and what a great joy it must be for you to share it with the world of music. Your many fans realize the sacrifices that you make to share your voice with them. You are one of the greats!! Thank you for your gift!!

  8. Anne Boardman

    Joseph -

    I have always admired the effort you put forth to spend time with your children. And as they grow older, you’ll need to work even harder but the rewards are certainly there. My husband and I have worked very hard to maintain solid relationships with both our children and actually to parent them (this seems somewhat rare in this day and age.) It hasn’t been easy at times and we didn’t have careers that take us all over the world like you do. However, now that my youngest is 31 (Vicki) and my oldest is 33 (Billy), we can truly say that we have participated in the formation of two fine adults that we can also call our friends.

    All the best.
    Anne

Leave a Reply

Joseph's Blog

September 27th, 2014

Malta’s 50th birthday.

Unfortunately work commitments prevented me from being present for the 50th Anniversary of Malta’s independence. By all accounts the show was quite something and Prince William seemed genuinely charmed by my fellow islanders. Kudos to the government and the organizers.

I sometimes wonder how the Maltese people managed to achieve so much in relatively little time. Lets not kid ourselves – we are a very small island and  in the middle of nowhere to boot. As yet we can boast 7,000 years of history, our own unique culture, language and a populace that, throughout the ages, has  repeatedly demonstrated  that it could rise to the occasion and punch above its weight when it really matters.  And how I wish, that it “matters” more often!

I simply hate it when I see some of my fellow countrymen squabble over a few votes and losing all principles whilst rubbishing great ideas just because they come from the other side of the fence. I can’t understand why there is a certain fanatical mindset, on both sides, that thinks only one half of the population is fit to “lead” the nation and should do so indefinitely. Can it please be a battle of ideas rather than “parading” colors in peacock like fashion?  For example - individuals who are simply not fit for purpose, should be treated exactly as such and not given positions of “pseudo importance” because it was “politically convenient” at the time.

The current government won the past elections with an historic majority, the likes of which we have never seen. Such a big win means power and this power surely must be “cashed” into responsibility. This majority has to be used to tackle certain hot issues and implement changes where necessary.

It’s easy to dismiss my words as “uninformed” or “utopian” but the thing is that I have travelled the world, pretty much constantly for the past 17 years. The more I see and soak in different cultures and experiences, the more I realize how much untapped potential Malta still has. Surely the management of our environment, education, infrastructure  and culture is in need of tweaking or a complete overhaul in some cases.

The good news is that I can see it happening already. The bad news is that it might not be happening as fast as it should. I really hope that our dynamic leaders do not mess up things in the end game and may the next 50 years be a time when we Maltese understand what we were, what we are now and what we could turn into if we truly become a united nation. It matters now…